• Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    Bobette Buster is a story consultant, lecturer, adjunct professor at USC Film School and screenwriter who works with major studios, including Disney and Pixar, and in top film programs all over the world. In each of the last 15 years, films from her students ranked in the Top 10 box-office worldwide, and have won all the major awards. She is the author of DO STORY: How To Tell Your Story So The World Listens. She suggests, if the 20th Century is dubbed the Industrial Age, the 21st Century be dubbed the Age of Story. From the advent of blogging to the continued popularity of feature films, we’ve become a society that runs on narrative. Using film clips from scores of beloved movies, this “story expert” will explain how storytelling actually works.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    Dr. Hurlbut is a physician and consulting professor at the Neuroscience Institute of Stanford University Medical Center. After receiving his undergraduate and medical training at Stanford, he completed postdoctoral studes in theology and medical ethics at Stanford and the Institut Catholique de Paris. In addition to teaching, he served for eight years on the U.S. President’s Council on Bioethics. He has also worked with NASA on projects in astrobiology and since 1998 has been a member of the Chemical and Biological Warfare working group at the Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation. He will share with us the beauty and mystery of the human brain from a faith perspective.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    A graduate of Harvard Law School, Stevenson is the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a law practice in Alabama dedicated to defending some of America’s most rejected and marginalized people. His efforts have reversed death penalties for dozens of condemned prisoners. He discusses the explosive rise in inmate populations, the disproportionate use of the death penalty against people of color and the use of life senteces against minors as part of a continuum running through the South’s ugly history of racial inequality, from slavery to Jim Crow to lynching. Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called Stevenson “America’s young Nelson Mandela.” He has recently published his debut novel Just Mercy, available in Fall 2014. He is the winner of a number of awards including the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award in social justice. This past year his work on behalf of incarcerated minors thrust him into the spotlight. Using scientific and criminological data, he has argued for a new understanding of adolescents and culpability. His efforts led to a Supreme Court ruling effectively barring mandatory life sentences without parole for minors. As a result, approximately 2,000 such cases in the United States may be reviewed.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    We wake up to our iPhones and sign off to Facebook. In between, we’re texting, downloading, and streaming—inundated with information from Google, Hulu and iTunes. How do we filter all our media to discern what matters? Craig Detweiler, who has his PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary, is a professor of communication and director of the Center for Entertainment, Media, and Culture at Pepperdine University where they are asking these kinds of questions. He is also an author, award-winning filmmaker, and cultural commentator who has been featured on CNN, NPR, and in the New York Times. In his book “iGods” he interacts with major symbols of our distracted age - like Apple, Amazon, YouTube and Twitter - to investigate the impact of the technologies and cultural phenomena that drives us.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    The number reads A27633 and it’s been tattooed on her forearm for over 70 years. Tova Friedman is one of the youngest known survivors of the Auschwitz concentration camp. She entered the camp with her mother and father at the age of 5 and despite being led into the gas chambers she miraculously survived. She was one of the 7,000 prisoners found alive during the liberation of Auschwitz by the Soviet army in January 1945 – this January marks the 70th anniversary of their liberation. She and two other women among the children liberated were interviewed by Holland, Michigan native Milton Nieuwsma for the 1998 book “Kinderlager: An Oral History of Young Holocaust Survivors” which was made into a PBS documentary in 2005. Tova’s parents also both survived and the family eventually immigrated to New York in 1950. She went on to attend the City College of New York and to receive a masters of social work at Rutgers University. Friedman has spent a great deal of her life working for the Jewish community. She lived in Israel from 1967 to 1977 with her husband and four children, and she taught at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She is the retired director of Jewish Family Service for Somerset County in New Jersey.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    The longest-serving mayor in Chicago’s history, Richard M. Daley has earned an international reputation as a leading innovator in urban development, fiscal policy and government stewardship. As mayor, Mr. Daley enhanced Chicago’s quality of life, improved the public school system and infrastructure, strengthened the economy, reduced crime, improved transportation and made Chicago one of the most environmentally friendly cities in the world. A former state senator and county prosecutor, Mr. Daley was elected mayor in 1989 and re-elected five times before deciding to retire from government in May of 2011. He now serves as Counsel to Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP, an international law firm based in Chicago; the Executive Chairman of Tur Partners LLC, a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy; a Director of the Board of The Coca-Cola Company; a member of the International Advisory Board for the Russian Direct Investment Fund; and a senior advisor to JP Morgan Chase, where he chairs the new “Global Cities Initiative,” a joint project of JP Morgan Chase and the Brookings Institution to help cities identify and leverage their greatest economic development resources.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • cinderella2In the grand tradition of Russian ballet, these graceful dancers from Moscow perform one of the most exquisite fairy tale ballets of all time. Cinderella is the iconic tale of the virtuous servant girl who, with the help of her fairy godmother, is magically transformed, attends the royal ball, and captures the heart of the prince. This ballet masterpiece is filled with sumptuous costumes, lush scenery, comical stepsisters and a malevolent stepmother.  Featuring an exuberant score by Prokofiev, it is easy to see why ballet enthusiasts have loved this ballet for generations. Russian National Ballet Theatre was founded in the late 1980s, and is committed to preserving and rejuvenating the timeless tradition of classical Russian ballet.

    Click here to purchase tickets. $25 adults, $15 children 18 and under. Main Stage. Reserved Seating. 7:30 p.m.

    Tickets are available here online, at the Dogwood Box Office, or at NCCA-Artsplace in downtown Fremont.

    Box Office hours are Tuesday - Friday 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. and two hours prior to an event.  For information, phone 231.924.8885.

    NCCA-Artsplace hours are Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., Thursdays 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m., and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    James Fishkin holds the Janet M. Peck Chair in International Communication at Stanford University where he is professor of Communication and professor of Political Science. He is also director of Stanford’s Center for Deliberative Democracy and chair of the Department of Communication. He is the author of a number of books and is best known for developing Deliberative Polling, a practice of public consultation that employs random samples of the citizenry to explore how opinions would change if they were more informed. Professor Fishkin and his collaborators have conducted Deliberative Polls in the US, Britain, Australia, Denmark, Bulgaria, China, Greece and other countries as well as in locations across the United States.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    An Iranian-American journalist, author and human rights advocate, Roxana Saberi moved to Iran in 2003 to work as the Iran correspondent for the U.S.-based Feature Story News. She filed reports for organizations such as NPR, BBC, ABC Radio and Fox News and was working on a book about Iran when she was arrested on January 31, 2009. Saberi was sentenced to eight years in Evin Prison on a trumped-up charge of espionage. In May 2009, following an international uproar, an Iranian court overturned the sentence and she was released. After returning to the United States, Saberi wrote Between Two Worlds: My Life and Captivity in Iran. She has spoken across the United States and has traveled to Europe, South America, and the Middle East to speak with the public, media, and government officials about Iran, human rights, and overcoming adversity.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.

  • Calvin College January Series 2015 - Remote Live Webcast

    As a jazz advocate and promoter, Alyce Claerbaut served as the president of the Northeastern Illinois University Jazz Society and was co-founder of the Skokie Valley Jazz Ensemble in the 1980’s. She has been involved in the arts scene primarily in Chicago with membership on grants panels for the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and as a panel member for the Illinois Arts Council. She served the Chicago Jazz Orchestra from 2003-2010, two years as Director of Public Relations and five years as Executive Director. Ms. Claerbaut’s formal music training includes concentration in applied voice. She has sung professionally in many types of settings – jazz, classical, art song, popular song, with a specialty in choral repertoire. She is the niece of the famed Billy Strayhorn, contemporary to Duke Ellington, and is currently the president of Billy Strayhorn Songs, Inc., a family-owned music publishing company. In this role she interacts with music publishers, producers and educators, particularly in jazz. Ms. Claerbaut is a Calvin alum and was instrumental in helping to bring Duke Ellington to perform in the Calvin Fieldhouse in 1967.

    This lecture will be broadcast via webcast at the Dogwood Center from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Admission is free. For those who would like a lunch ($5) , please call 231.924.8885 to reserve one at least 24 hours in advance of the lecture you would like to attend.

    For more information on the Calvin College January Series click here.

    The Dogwood Center, a remote site for the Calvin College January Series, is supported in part by the Fremont Area Community Foundation.